A manager should multiply, not add

If you are managing a team of people that are transporting rocks from A to B and you spend one hour picking ups rock from A and dropping them on B, you added one hour of work. If you spend that one hour procuring wheeled carts so that people don’t have to carry rocks on their backs, you increased their performance by 25% (and happiness). One task makes you an adder, one makes you a multiplier.

And this is very semantically correct. If your team has 0 people, increasing 25% of 0 is still 0. Your effort was wasted.

If you are a multiplier, the more people you manage, the more impact you have. That’s why often the compensation of a person at the top of a huge organization is so big (not to say that current CEO compensation is correct, that’s another story).

I find this is a good heuristic to know if I’m working on the right thing as a manager. Am I adding or am I multiplying? Sometimes I have to add, but if all I do is add, am I a manager?

The output of a manager is the output of the organizational units under his or her supervision or influence.

Andy Grove, High Output Management

Something to keep in mind is that multiplying is hard. Well, it’s hard to find the opportunities when you can multiply. You need to sit down, look at the team carrying the stones, think about a better way, go find some carts, get a quote, evaluate it, run an experiment, see the increase in performance, discover not everyone knows what to do with it, write the manual and the training program, stop everyone from carrying stones (temporarily dropping productivity) so they can learn to use the wheeled carts.

If as a manager you are so busy with interruption work that constantly lands on your lap, busy doing adding work, you will not have the time and mental space to think and find opportunities to multiply. This is why I don’t like the always-busy CEO or always-busy manager. When do they do their thinking?

If you want to learn more about this I highly recommend Andy Grove’s High Output Management.

Book Review: Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland

scrum coverI first came in contact with Scrum when I was working at Google and since then, I’ve been applying it to the startups I co-founded with good outcomes. Since I was searching for a job, I kept seeing “Scrum Master” come up over and over and I thought it was about time that I learned all the details of Scrum to be able to be a proper Scrum master. Well, in only a couple of ways I finished the book and discovered I was already a proper Scrum master, having learned all the details about it from my time at Google and blog posts.

About the book itself, it’s short and entertaining with enough story telling to keep you engaged even if you only have a passing interest in Scrum. The system is rather simple, with only a few moving pieces and I’m glad of that. Simple systems tend to work better. The testimonials of how much productive a team is with Scrum feel exaggerated completely out of proportion, but then again, some companies are so terrible at producing anything at all, being the cradle of dysfunction, that is no surprise their productivity can be doubled or quadrupled.

★★★★☆

Buy The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time in USA

Buy The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time in UK